The Latest from the Front Lines of Literature

Presented by Farrar, Straus and Giroux

  • National Poetry Month
  • Purity by Jonathan Franzen
  • Black Cards
  • Flannery O'Connor
  • FSG's Favorites of 2014

Writers and editors on craft, publishing, reception, and more...

Writers in Conversation, Editors and Authors in Conversation, and more...

Considerations of Willa Cather, George Plimpton, Seamus Heaney, and more...

“If we do not root ourselves in others’ hearts, / our lives are spent on the periphery.” - Averill Curdy

"Reading translations can give you a broader vision of the world and of people and emotions" - Rosalind Harvey

Jonathan Franzen, Marilynne Robinson, Etgar Keret, and more from Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

  • What links the Investment Bank of Torabundo, www.myhotswaitress.com (yes, with an s, don’t ask), an art heist, a novel called For the Love of a Clown, a six-year-old boy with the unfortunate name of Remington Steele, a lonely French banker, a tiny Pacific island, and a pest control business run by an ex-KGB agent? Only one thing, really: Paul Murray’s madcap new novel, The Mark and the Void. It’s the first we’ve heard from the man since the wild Skippy Dies, and we’re pleased to announce here his upcoming tour this fall. To whet your whistle (and attempt an explanation), here’s the first few pages from the new novel in stores October 20th.

  • We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

  • I begin with a character. As you know, there are many kinds of characters—Henry James’s peripheral but all the same essential character who observes the narrative with the same mystification and curiosity as does the reader; Joan Didion’s ironical and vaguely menacing character, sometimes even the writer Joan Didion herself, who tells you the plot in the first paragraph, and then fills in the blanks; Stendhal’s historical figure, who is a creature both of his own ambition and the strivings of history.

Quotes
  • “We narrate our lives as we live them, making sense of the chaos by organizing our experiences.”

    Nelly Reifler

  • “I want to be honest with readers, that is my pact with them.”

    Jonathan Franzen

  • “Don’t go to events; go to the receptions after the events. If possible, skip the receptions and go to the afterparties, where you can have a real conversation with someone.”

    Sarah Manguso

  • “Sip your coffee in the warm glow of first light. This is not writing. This is the idea of writing. Go back to bed.”

    Aaron Hirsh

  • “I really do believe literary fiction as a genre is more backward- than forward-looking. I suspect it believes in inevitability more than contingency. I fear it prefers memories to plans.”

    Robin Sloan

  • “My joy is the joy of the Trickster. It’s the joy of Loki. It’s the joy of the Coyote, because I know it’s an unstable system, and it will be overthrown, no matter how majestic it is.”

    Sjón

  • “Americans continue to visit Paris not just for Paris, but for ‘Paris.’ As if out of some collective nostalgia for what Paris should be, more than what it is. For someone else’s memories.”

    Rosecrans Baldwin