The Latest from the Front Lines of Literature

Presented by Farrar, Straus and Giroux

  • Here I Am
  • Priveledge-the-Forbidden
  • On-Time-and-War
  • All-True-Stories
  • A Month of FSG Poetry

Writers and editors on craft, publishing, reception, and more...

Writers in Conversation, Editors and Authors in Conversation, and more...

Considerations of Willa Cather, George Plimpton, Seamus Heaney, and more...

“If we do not root ourselves in others’ hearts, / our lives are spent on the periphery.” - Averill Curdy

"Reading translations can give you a broader vision of the world and of people and emotions" - Rosalind Harvey

Jonathan Franzen, Marilynne Robinson, Etgar Keret, and more from Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

  • We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

  • On August 29, 1957, Candida sent me a note that read, “ Here is the script of CATCH 18 by Joseph Heller about which we talked yesterday. I’ve been watching Heller ever since the publication of Chapter 1 in New World Writing about a year ago. He’s published a good bit in The Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, etc. I’ll tell you more about him when I see you at lunch next week. As ever, Candida.” About seventy-five pages of manuscript came with it, and I was knocked out by the voice, the humor, the anger. We offered Joe five hundred dollars as an option payment. This was only months after Jack Goodman’s death, and the editorial department had developed no real modus operandi; I suppose I just said “I want to do this” and there was nobody interested enough to say no. Joe and Candida decided to wait until there was enough of a manuscript to warrant an actual contract.

  • As an undergraduate I became fixated on my tutor, Ann Wordsworth, a woman of devastating command who held the other English Literature dons in contempt. Tutorials were conducted in a grubby shed in the college grounds where we chain-smoked Gitanes and quaffed red wine from, for some reason, small cartons. In an attempt to impersonate Ann’s wistful, pained intellect, I employed in those years a world-weary prose style, and while I read out my weekly essays she listened, hunched up in an attitude of agony, dragging heavily on her cigarette, eyes fixed on the filthy, threadbare carpet.

Quotes
  • “We narrate our lives as we live them, making sense of the chaos by organizing our experiences.”

    Nelly Reifler

  • “I want to be honest with readers, that is my pact with them.”

    Jonathan Franzen

  • “Don’t go to events; go to the receptions after the events. If possible, skip the receptions and go to the afterparties, where you can have a real conversation with someone.”

    Sarah Manguso

  • “Sip your coffee in the warm glow of first light. This is not writing. This is the idea of writing. Go back to bed.”

    Aaron Hirsh

  • “I really do believe literary fiction as a genre is more backward- than forward-looking. I suspect it believes in inevitability more than contingency. I fear it prefers memories to plans.”

    Robin Sloan

  • “My joy is the joy of the Trickster. It’s the joy of Loki. It’s the joy of the Coyote, because I know it’s an unstable system, and it will be overthrown, no matter how majestic it is.”

    Sjón

  • “Americans continue to visit Paris not just for Paris, but for ‘Paris.’ As if out of some collective nostalgia for what Paris should be, more than what it is. For someone else’s memories.”

    Rosecrans Baldwin