The Latest from the Front Lines of Literature

Presented by Farrar, Straus and Giroux

  • Priveledge-the-Forbidden
  • On-Time-and-War
  • All-True-Stories
  • A Month of FSG Poetry
  • Laura van den Berg & Emily St. John Mandel

Writers and editors on craft, publishing, reception, and more...

Writers in Conversation, Editors and Authors in Conversation, and more...

Considerations of Willa Cather, George Plimpton, Seamus Heaney, and more...

“If we do not root ourselves in others’ hearts, / our lives are spent on the periphery.” - Averill Curdy

"Reading translations can give you a broader vision of the world and of people and emotions" - Rosalind Harvey

Jonathan Franzen, Marilynne Robinson, Etgar Keret, and more from Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

  • I’d been researching a biography of the late art dealer Richard Bellamy (1927–1998) for several years when he popped up in a dream. In waking hours, I tracked the man whom everybody called Dick through the post-war art world, perplexed by his absence from the grand narrative of late modernism. He survived in people’s memories, not in history books.

  • We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.


  • In curating a collection of Ted Hughes’ poems about animals, Alice Oswald has responded to one of the themes Hughes saw in his own poetry—the “vivid life of their own,” the transformation of nature into language and vice versa. Here, she outlines the process of that curation in the introduction to the book.

Quotes
  • “We narrate our lives as we live them, making sense of the chaos by organizing our experiences.”

    Nelly Reifler

  • “I want to be honest with readers, that is my pact with them.”

    Jonathan Franzen

  • “Don’t go to events; go to the receptions after the events. If possible, skip the receptions and go to the afterparties, where you can have a real conversation with someone.”

    Sarah Manguso

  • “Sip your coffee in the warm glow of first light. This is not writing. This is the idea of writing. Go back to bed.”

    Aaron Hirsh

  • “I really do believe literary fiction as a genre is more backward- than forward-looking. I suspect it believes in inevitability more than contingency. I fear it prefers memories to plans.”

    Robin Sloan

  • “My joy is the joy of the Trickster. It’s the joy of Loki. It’s the joy of the Coyote, because I know it’s an unstable system, and it will be overthrown, no matter how majestic it is.”

    Sjón

  • “Americans continue to visit Paris not just for Paris, but for ‘Paris.’ As if out of some collective nostalgia for what Paris should be, more than what it is. For someone else’s memories.”

    Rosecrans Baldwin