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FSG Poetry Award Winners Sweepstakes

With Nobel laureates Derek Walcott and Pablo Neruda, National Book Award winner Louise Glück, and National Book Critics Choice Award winner Ishion Hutchinson, this poetry prize pack is full of FSG’s award winners through the years!

Enter to win one of three poetry sets that include books by Ishion Hutchinson (NBCC 2017), Louise Glück (National Book Award 2014), Derek Walcott (Nobel Prize in Literature 1992), and Pablo Neruda (Nobel Prize in Literature 1971).

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

Jace Clayton’s book, Uproot, travels across the present musical landscape: from the prevalence of Auto-Tune in Moroccan Berber music to the slow archiving of traditional music on soon-obsolete computers. For the launch of the book, Clayton sat down with the Met’s social media manager, Kimberly Drew, to talk about ideal readers, the realities of the international DJ life, and technology. Their conversation was sandwiched between two DJ sets, one by Sonido Kumbala, a Mexican cumbia sonidera group that called out to listeners on both sides of the border as they played, and another by the Philly duo SCRAAATCH.

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.


No art has been denounced as often as poetry. It’s even bemoaned by poets: “I, too, dislike it,” wrote Marianne Moore. “Many more people agree they hate poetry,” Ben Lerner writes, “than can agree what poetry is. I, too, dislike it and have largely organized my life around it and do not experience that as a contradiction because poetry and the hatred of poetry are inextricable in ways it is my purpose to explore.”

World Enough by Maureen McLane

Maureen N. McLane’s poem “Haunt” does just that. Or perhaps more accurately, it is itself haunted, by the two versions of the anonymous Child Ballad No. 26 (“The Three Ravens” / “The Twa Corbies”) that the author acknowledges as reference points in her notes.

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

The Blizzard by Vladimir Sorokin

Garin, a district doctor, is desperately trying to reach the village of Dolgoye, where a mysterious epidemic is turning people into zombies—but a trip that should last no more than a few hours threatens to turn into a metaphysical journey. Vladimir Sorokin is one of the most inventive authors writing today, and we are pleased to share an excerpt from his new novel, The Blizzard

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

All the Houses by Karen Olsson

Karen Olsson on where fiction touches the real, where our empathy most easily attaches, and how the true-life scandal of the Iran-Contra affair revealed itself to be the perfect backdrop for her sophomore novel, All the Houses, which NPR has called “funny, sweet and beautifully written.”

This Week on Twitter - Farrar, Straus & Giroux

We’ve rounded up some of the best of what our authors have been doing, reading, and thinking this week.

Confession of the Lioness by Mia Couto

Mia Couto is one of the most prominent writers in Portuguese-speaking Africa, and his latest novel, Confessions of the Lioness, made the Man Booker shortlist. Couto combines reality, superstition, and magic realism to spin a dark, poetic mystery about the tribal women of Kulumani and the lionesses that hunt them.

Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

Work in Progress is a compendium of original works, exclusive excerpts, and interviews with authors from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. These are the stories behind the books which FSG started publishing in 1992 as a printed newsletter. Now we send an email every week with new essays, upcoming events, our favorite tweets, and a curated selection of pieces we’ve been reading from around the web. Sometimes we even have sweepstakes and the occasional quiz.

Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

Work in Progress is a compendium of original works, exclusive excerpts, and interviews with authors from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. These are the stories behind the books which FSG started publishing in 1992 as a printed newsletter. Now we send an email every week with new essays, upcoming events, our favorite tweets, and a curated selection of pieces we’ve been reading from around the web. Sometimes we even have sweepstakes and the occasional quiz.

Jeff VanderMeer, Annihilation

Work in Progress is a compendium of original works, exclusive excerpts, and interviews with authors from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. These are the stories behind the books which FSG started publishing in 1992 as a printed newsletter. Now we send an email every week with new essays, upcoming events, our favorite tweets, and a curated selection of pieces we’ve been reading from around the web. Sometimes we even have sweepstakes and the occasional quiz.

Night

Night is Elie Wiesel’s masterpiece, a candid, horrific, and deeply poignant autobiographical account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps. This new translation by Marion Wiesel, Elie’s wife and frequent translator, presents this seminal memoir in the language and spirit truest to the author’s original intent. And in a substantive new preface, Elie reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man’s capacity for inhumanity to man.