On Writers

Shirley Hazzard

Shirley Hazzard, who died on December 12 at the age of 85, wrote two collections of short stories, four novels, and three works of nonfiction. FSG published her last two works: in 2000, a memoir about Graham Greene, Greene on Capri, and, in 2003, her National Book Award-winning novel, The Great Fire.

Shakespeare in Swahililand

Though I was always a bookish child, two things happened shortly after my sixteenth birthday which fixed my course toward words and writing. The first of these was discovering that the British Poet Laureate was paid in wine. That I immediately decided this was the job for me was probably down in part to the flippancy of adolescence, but I think it also appealed to the noble disdain of youth that one’s life should be traded for mere money. (I have long since stopped writing poetry, but it is certainly useful to a budding author to think of being unpaid as a positive virtue.) The second important event was the gift of two volumes of poetry, one by T. S. Eliot and the other by W. H. Auden, from my mother, given on my first visit to the Middle East and first read when we were driving through the Jiddat al-Harasis desert in southern Oman.

Utopia Drive by Erik Reece

“A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not even worth glancing at,” wrote Oscar Wilde in 1891. Yet for nearly two thousand years after Plato’s Republic, most Western thinkers did ignore Wilde’s map. Christianity, as interpreted by the Apostle Paul, had hung the Kingdom of God in the heavens, so there seemed little reason to look for it here in the fallen world.

Fish

Marianne Moore’s masterpiece “The Fish” is that rare poem that enters the mind through the front door and the back door at the same time. There’s not another poem that has its cake and eats it too like “The Fish” does. It luxuriates in its absence of the human.

Leviathan in the Sun: Les Murray

I first read Hamlet in Jamaica. The bleak daylight surrounding my high school Happy Grove was like the faded glow of an old photograph. Rain was expected; it never came. There might’ve been thunder, or that could just have been the pages turning in unison.

Ange Mlinko's Cabinet of Curiousities

Who could resist this invitation to eavesdrop on the fabulous? The title for Ange Mlinko’s most recent book, Marvelous Things Overheard is taken from a collection of anecdotes and wonders, falsely attributed to Aristotle, which explain, in tight descriptive units, marvels of the Mediterranean lands. Already in the title, two gaps have opened up between the world-as-we-find-it and the world-as-as-we-might-be-about-to-encounter-it.

The Uses and Abuses of Criticism

The big holy cheese Rilke declared that “more or less felicitous misunderstandings” are the most one can hope for from criticism. To him (he claimed), a review is a personal missive addressed to someone else. I don’t know if he’s referring to his recently past self, the author of whatever the work (though I don’t think it’s that), or just the “peanut-crunching crowd” (Plath), anything addressed to which he of course, like most of us, disdained.

FSG's Best Book of 2015

We asked the staff of Farrar, Straus and Giroux to pick the best books published in 2015, name their favorite titles—new, old, or forthcoming—that they read this year, and to share which FSG books they’ll be giving during the holidays.

These are FSG’s Favorites Books of 2015.

The Brothers Vonnegut

In 1947, concerned about supporting his family, Kurt Vonnegut took a job his brother recommended him for in the PR department at General Electric. The GE News Bureau was organized like a real newspaper—except that its purpose was to produce stories about all the fabulous inventions and time-saving new products GE was producing.

Lucia Berlin

Lucia Berlin’s writing has got snap. When I think of it, I sometimes imagine a master drummer in motion behind a large trap set, striking ambidextrously at an array of snares, tom-toms, and ride cymbals while working pedals with both feet.

Didion and Dunne in their Malibu home, December 1977, shortly after the publication of A Book of Common Prayer. (AP Photo)

Joan Didion was enamored not of the ocean but of the “look of the horizon . . . It is always there, flat.” If she was no longer physically comfortable in the Central Valley, she needed the solacing feel of her childhood geography. Each day ended fast, no muss—a snuffing of the sun in the sea, a healthy glass of bourbon. She felt Malibu was “a new kind of life.

Joseph Brodsky - Collected Poems in English

By Joseph Brodsky’s death in 1996 he had translated many of his own poems into English, a language in which he had by then taught and written for nearly half his life. Coming from the hand of their author, these works fall somewhere between wholly subsidiary translation and original creation.

Pablo Neruda

Pablo Neruda found me in a strange way. I was still a teenager, obsessed with the Beats and pouring over Whitman in English class. I enjoyed writing poetry, but did not yet take it seriously. I was standing in the poetry section of the Barnes and Noble in the Cape Cod Mall, with my boyfriend, who was also an aspiring poet, trying to discern what new book to bite into. An older man who looked identical to Charles Bukowski, down to the mole on his face, appeared from around the corner of the shelf. Returning a book to the shelf, the man said, “This is what you should be reading. That’s the good stuff.”

Frank Bidart

Even now, the voice that announces itself in the opening line of “Herbert White,” the first poem in Frank Bidart’s first collection, Golden State—“When I hit her on the head, it was good”—shocks and unnerves me, its force undulled by fifteen years of rereading.

Intersteller Poetry: Derek Walcott and Star Trek

When I read Walcott it happens every third line or so. I wince with envy, pure and simple. Not the way Salieri was jealous of Mozart, more the way the bloke in the suit sits beside his date in the dark cinema, watching Fred Astaire dance a smooth dance.

Charles Wright

Charles Wright. The poet between now and not-now; between know and not-know; between the sun’s fire and a mountain’s snow; the poet between Dante and dude.

The Supernatural Grace of Flannery O Connor

In commemoration of Flannery O’Connor’s 90th birthday, we are honored to share Robert Giroux’s introduction to The Collected Stories of Flannery O’Connor about their working relationship and O’Connor’s singular literary gifts.

Soldier, Spy, and Translator: C.K. Moncrieff

Since 1922, almost all English-language readers have encountered Marcel Proust by way of the translator C. K. Scott Moncrieff, who wrestled with Proust’s seven-volume masterpiece—published as Remembrance of Things Past—until his death in 1930. Yet little was known about him—publicly a debonair man of letters and celebrated war hero, Scott Moncrieff was Catholic and homosexual, secretly a spy in Mussolini’s Italy, and a partygoer who was lonely deep down. Now, for the first time, his great-great-niece, Jean Findlay, has given us a vibrant portrait of this brilliant translator and his era in her moving biography, Chasing Lost Time. The following is an excerpt of the introduction.

Sympathy for the Devil

We were about to meet Gore Vidal, renowned for his acerbic wit and cutting remarks about those who didn’t measure up to his exacting standards. Having watched him on television mete out discipline to the likes of William F. Buckley and Norman Mailer, I preferred not to imagine the mincemeat he might make of an American couple in Rome for a year with their six-month-old son.

A Pious Anxiety Flannery O' Connor

No modern American writer has had so lively a posthumous life as Flannery O’Connor. Paul Elie on A Prayer Journal and Flannery O’Connor’s impact on writing.